Distractions, reflections

David Ing, at large … Sometimes, my mind wanders

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2017/01 Moments January 2017

Toronto, Ontario. (A whole month without leaving town, since Don Mills and Scarborough are Metropolitan Toronto)
Toronto, Ontario.

Nathan Phillips Square
Nathan Phillips Square: Afternoon traffic jam amongst skaters on the rink, while roads are empty and most businesses closed for New Year’s Day. Pedestrian volume high in the Eaton Centre across the street, more browsers than buyers enjoying an indoor stroll. Temperature above freezing and sun encouraged bicycle ride, bundled up with winter wear. (Nathan Phillips Square, Queen Street West, Toronto, Ontario) 20170101
Roberts Library
Roberts Library: When the e-version isn’t available, a quick trip to the library stacks works. University is still quiet after holiday season, yet there’s still some people on computer terminals after 9 p.m. When I was an undergrad, I visited this section frequently. (Robarts Library, 11th floor, St. George Street, University of Toronto, Ontario) 20170103
Toronto Public Library, Queen Saulter Branch
Toronto Public Library, Queen Saulter Branch: Neighbourhood walk to pick up book and DVD, chest cold having discouraged leaving the house in a week. Neo-classical building was designed by E.J. Lennox, serving as Postal Station G from 1914 to 1975. Renovated in 1979, the library and community centre is a landmark in South Riverdale. (Toronto Public Library, Queen Saulter Branch, 765 Queen Street East, Riverside district, Toronto) 20170114
OCADU
OCADU: Systems Thinking Ontario first meeting of New Year discussing some topics looking forward, reviewing the format of sessions in history. Repeated contextual presentation from 2012 including the map of ignorance, postnormal science, and the design in inquiring systems. (Lambert Lounge, OCADU, McCaul Street, Toronto, Ontario) 20170118
India Paan
India Paan: Sugar cane and grilled corn outside, but server inside on grey above-freezing January Sunday. Pedestrian traffic light, with a few families coming out after lunches. (India Paan, Gerrard Street East, Toronto, Ontario) 20170122

Continue reading2017/01 Moments January 2017

2006/12/28 A thinking lunch, and the library

Lunch with Dan, and then research in the Robarts library.
Every few months when in town, I try to schedule lunch with Dan. We discuss business research, while I’m still working things out. This helps me because I learn while explaining ideas to Dan, and he appreciates the discussion because I don’t seem to see the world the same way as other people.

Dan, at SaiGon Palace Continue reading2006/12/28 A thinking lunch, and the library

Wed. Oct. 19, 2005: Late night at Robarts Library

A light night visit to the stacks at Robarts library.
David hits the stacks at the university, in the evening when it’s not busy.

(by David):  I have an alumnus library card for U. of Toronto, but access to journal articles requires full-time enrolment. The university library has a few public access terminals up in the stacks, so I can read the full selection of journals if I go to the university in person.

It’s a bit annoying that the university changes protocols every fall, so it takes a bit to find out the new ways. When I was at the university a few weeks ago, I couldn’t find the public access terminals amongst the two dozen that are immediately in front of the elevators on the 11th floor (where the business and economics books are). This time, I decided to try to find the terminals on the 9th floor. They turned out to not be outside the elevators, but hidden away in the stacks, near the books. The PCs have all been replaced, so the screens are a lot sharper than they used to be.

Between 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. on a Wednesday night, it was relatively quiet. Students living on campus should be able to access library resources with their IDs, so they wouldn’t physically have to be in the Robarts building.

I usually don’t stay past the time that the library closes, but was trying to get the last few references done. At 11 p.m., they turned out the lights. At 11:10, there was a special elevator with the library patrol, picking up the last few stragglers. Since the elevators are shut down at 11 p.m., I guess that the alternative is to walk down the stairs.

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