Distractions, reflections

David Ing, at large … Sometimes, my mind wanders

2009/02/28 Meiji Jingu, Shinto Shrine, Tokyo

I’ve been to the Harajuku district on every trip to Tokyo, and somehow managed to arrive at the Meiji Jingu at times when the gates are closed.  This time, Marianne and I found the gates to the garden open.

di_20090228-004444-ichinotorii.jpg

I guess that Saturday afternoon is a good bet for families to visit the gardens.

di_20090228-004602-meiji-jingu-gate-visitors.jpg

As we entered the gardens walking north, I enjoyed the view of the brook to the side.

di_20090228-004842-meiji-jingu-brook.jpg

The park honours the Emperor Meji who passed away in 1912, and is interred in Kyoto.  The view of the long, tree-covered walk is impressive.

di_20090228-004926-meiji-jingu-walk.jpg

Sake barrels are displayed as decorations, emptied from prior festivals after having been donated by local brewers.

di_20090228-005140-meiji-jingu-casks.jpg

The Meiji period was seen as enlightened one, when the emperor enjoyed western food and took wine with it.  Wineries in Bourgogne, France, consecrated these barrels in the emperor’s honour.

di_20090228-005152-meiji-jingu-barrels.jpg

At the end of that entry walk, a turn left brought us to to the torii (shrine gate).

di_20090228-005310-meiji-jingu-torii.jpg

Approaching the main shrine building is the covered fountain typical in temples.

di_20090228-005704-meiji-jingu-fountain.jpg

As did other visitors, Marianne cleansed herself with the water.

di_20090228-005716-meiji-jingu-fountain-mk.jpg

A smaller torii marked the perimeter of the main temple.

di_20090228-005814-meiji-jingu-torii.jpg

Marianne took care to cross over the threshold into the main temple.

di_20090228-005938-meiji-jingu-threshold.jpg

The courtyard is enclosed all the way around by buildings.

di_20090228-005958-meiji-jingu-courtyard.jpg

We were surprised and honoured to be just in time to watch a wedding procession

di_20090228-010050-meiji-jingu-wedding-procession.jpg

Everyone in the shrine stopped to admire the wedding group.

di_20090228-010128-meiji-jingu-wedding-procession-past.jpg

Marianne had forgotten to bring her camera, and was impressed by the embroidery on the back of this bright kimono.

di_20090228-010204-meiji-jingu-wedding-kimono-back.jpg

After a brief pause for ceremony, the wedding party crossed the courtyard to another gate.

di_20090228-010940-meiji-jingu-courtyard.jpg

Through the gate, we saw them taking formal photos, presumably with extended family and friends.

di_20090228-011150-meiji-jingu-wedding-photos.jpg

We continued into the main temple, which had an internal courtyard.

di_20090228-010656-meiji-jingu-courtyard.jpg

Visitors made offerings at the altar.

di_20090228-010448-meiji-jingu-altar.jpg

On one side was a taiko drum, that might be used in a festival.

di_20090228-010632-meiji-jingu-taiko-drum.jpg

As we were about to leave, Marianne noticed the curtain tassels, commenting on their colour.

di_20090228-010844-meiji-jingu-tassels.jpg

Outside the main shrine, we noticed the walls of votive tablets.

di_20090228-010908-meiji-jingu-votive-tablets.jpg

The gardens were no less grand, as we left.

di_20090228-011258-meiji-jingu-leaving.jpg

I hadn’t noticed the detail of water flowing by the walk on the way in.

di_20090228-011428-meiji-jingu-curb.jpg

We had also crossed over an arched bridge on the way in.  I guess that I was too focused on getting to the shrine on the approach!

di_20090228-012058-meiji-jingu-bridge.jpg

Looking down from the arched bridge, only a small trickle of water was flowing in the stream.

di_20090228-012126-meiji-jingu-bridge-view-down.jpg

The gardens are a tranquil oasis right beside one of the busiest train stations in Tokyo.  We wouldn’t have known it was there!

di_20090228-004502-meiji-jingu-map.jpg

The shrine and garden were constructed in the honour of the Emperor Meiji, who I’ve now learned ushered in modern Japan.

[Start a large-image lightbox screen show over this blog post (in a supported browser)]

[See the webphotos album (with a slideshow option)]

  • Recent Posts

  • Archives

  • RSS on Coevolving

    • Doing, not-doing; errors of commission, errors of omission
      Should we do, or not-do?  Russell Ackoff, over many years, wrote about (negative) potential consequences: There are two possible types of decision-making mistakes, which are not equally easy to identify. (1) Errors of commission: doing something that should not have been done. (2) Errors of omission: not doing something that should have been done. For […]
    • Systemic design agendas in education and design research
      The final publication of the October 2016 Relating Systems Thinking and Design Symposium workshop "Some Future Paths for Design Professionals: DesignX and Systemic Design" was published as “Systemic Design Agendas in Education and Design Research” in FormAkademisk, following 2 years of rewrites, reviews and revisions.
    • A federated wiki site on cPanel
      Federated wiki is deployed on a node.js server, an environment which has become available on some cPanel shared hosting providers. Here are some instructions written while restoring a wiki site originally installed in 2014-2015 on a cloud provider.
    • Artificial intelligence, natural stupidity
      Reading The Undoing Project, by Michael Lewis, reminded me of a PhD course at UBC with Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky, before they were recognized as Nobel prize candidates.
    • The impacts of platforms
      Platforms have had only a short history, so much of the research is still definitional, with proposed frameworks.
    • Platforms, an emerging appreciation
      When the term "platform" is used, today, what does that mean?
  • RSS on Media Queue

  • RSS on Ing Brief

    • Contextual dyadic thinking (Lee, 2017)
      Contextual dyadic thinking is proposed by Keekok Lee in her 2017 The Philosophical Foundations of Classical Chinese Medicine. This is as a way of appreciating Chinese implicit logic, as an alternative to dualistic thinking that has developed over centuries in Western philosophy.
    • Dao, de, wei, wuwei (Lai 2003)
      Appreciating wei and wuwei has led to the context of dao and de, in the writings of Karyn L. Lai. The scholarly review acknowledges prior interpretations of de and dao.
    • Engineering Resilience vs. Ecological Resilience (Holling, 1996)
      For @theNASciences in 1996, #CSHolling clarified definitions of resilience, with engineering seeking one equilibrium state, while ecology recognizes many. Those who emphasize the near-equilibrium definition of engineering resilience, for example, draw predominantly from traditions of deductive mathematical theory (Pimm,. 1984) where simplified, untouched ecological systems are imagined, or from traditions of engineering, where the motive […]
    • Service coproductions as reciprocal activities
      In addition to extrinsic economic exchange, #JohnMCarroll #JiaweiChen #ChienWenTinaYuan #BenjaminHanrahan @ISTatPENNSTATE say service coproductions relying on all participants to collaborate in both economic exchange and social exchange. Service coproduction is a special case of service provision in which the roles of service provider and service recipient both require active participation. Examples include healthcare, education, and […]
    • Science and Society in East and West | Joseph Needham | 2004
      In researching #SystemsChange, fundamental differences in science and philosophy in the west and the Chinese were surfaced by #JosephNeedham. A useful translation of wéi and wú wéi (i.e. 為 and 無為 , or 为 and 无为) is the ways of "human will" and "nature" as juxtaposed.
    • Wiki as computational platform
      Thinking forward on #federatedwiki, rather than backwards by @wardcunningham. > [Federated wiki] is a computational platform for the collaborative construction of things that work and will continue to work as platform technology evolves underneath it. > Too much thinking about wiki as a note-taking system will just hold it back.
  • Meta

  • Translate

  • 
  • moments. daviding.com

    Random selections from the past year
  • Creative Commons License
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    Theme modified from DevDmBootstrap4 by Danny Machal