Distractions, reflections

David Ing, at large … Sometimes, my mind wanders

2007/08/11 Ueno Park, Kiyomizu Kannon-do, Metropolitan Art Museum, Tokyo

Ueno Park is a patch of green in the midst of urbanity, with skyscrapers surrounding the area. This weekend marked the beginning of a holiday when many Tokyo residents go back to the their home towns. We started at the south entrance to the park, and walked north.

20070811_Ueno_Park_south_entry.jpg

It’s unclear whether this is the normal state for Ueno Park, but we noticed that the ground was more littered than we had seen elsewhere. Since it was a hot day, perhaps many people had left their apartments for the shade of the park.

20070811_Ueno_Park_south_walk.jpg

We encountered the entry for the Kiyomizu Kannon-do. This design is related to the Toyokuni shrine that we had seen at the end of walking tour in Kyoto.

20070811_Ueno_Kiyomizu_Kannon-do_entry.jpg

As we stepped down into the ravine, the long series of torii indicates that this is a prosperous temple.

20070811_Ueno_Kiyomizu_Kannon-do_torii.jpg

In comparison to the bright colour of the torii, the altar doesn’t make as much of an impact.

20070811_Ueno_Kiyomizu_Kannon-do_altar.jpg

Back on the main path, a fork in the road had a symbol from the other side of the Pacific: a totem pole.

20070811_Ueno_Park_totem.jpg

In my search for contemporary art, I had thought that the Metropolitan Art Museum would give us a taste of works produced by living artists in today’s Japan. The museum includes six galleries.

20070811_Metropolitan_Art_Museum_exterior.jpg

Coinciding with the holiday week, however, the galleries were being cleared out, in anticipation of new exhibits. Some were stripped bare before we got there.

20070811_Metropolitan_Art_Museum_gallery.jpg

Another large gallery — in a sunken room — was under active construction.

20070811_Metropolitan_Art_Museum_gallery_change.jpg

In the courtyard was some large pieces that don’t move. Presuming that these were indicative of the type of art that are normally in the museum, I’m disappointed at our timing.

20070811_Metropolitan_Art_Museum_courtyard_jacks.jpg

We left Ueno Park before sunset, to return to the hotel before an evening out.

20070811_Ueno_Chuo-Dori_view_south.jpg

We stopped by a few stores — including a Bic Camera — but didn’t spend any money. Mostly, the air conditioning was some relief from the summer heat.

  • Recent Posts

  • Archives

  • RSS on Coevolving

    • Causal Texture of the Environment
      For those who haven’t read the 1965 Emery and Trist article, its seems as though my colleague Doug McDavid was foresighted enough to blog a summary in 2016!  His words have always welcomed here, as Doug was a cofounder of this web site.  At the time of writing, the target audience for this piece was […]
    • Causal texture, contextualism, contextural
      In the famous 1965 Emery and Trist article, the terms “causal texture” and “contextual environment” haven’t been entirely clear to me.  With specific meanings in the systems thinking literature, looking up definitions in the dictionary generally isn’t helpful.  Diving into the history of the uses of the words provides some insight. 1. Causal texture 2. […]
    • Trist in Canada, Organizational Change, Action Learning
      Towards appreciating “action learning”, the history of open systems thinking and pioneering work in organization science, the influence of Action Learning Group — in the Faculty of Environment Studies founded in 1968 at York University (Toronto) — deserves to be resurfaced. 1. Trist in Canada 2. Environmental studies, and contextualism in organizational-change 3. Action learning, […]
    • Remembering Doug McDavid
      The news that Doug McDavid — my friend, colleague, and one of the original cofounders of the Coevolving Innovations web site in 2006 — had passed, first came through mutual IBM contacts.  More details subsequently showed up on LinkedIn from Mike McClintock. Doug left us on May 9, while working at his desk, likely in […]
    • Pattern language, form language, general systems theory, R-theory
      One of the challenges with the development of pattern languages is the cross-appropriation of approaches of techniques from one domain (i.e. built physical environments) into others (e.g. software development, social change). The distinction between pattern language and form language is made by Nikos Salingaros. Design in architecture and urbanism is guided by two distinct complementary […]
    • How do Systems Changes become natural practice?
      The 1995 article by Spinosa, Flores & Dreyfus on “Disclosing New Worlds” was assigned reading preceding the fourth of four lectures for the Systemic Design course in the Master’s program in Strategic Foresight and Innovation at OCAD University.  In previous years, this topic was a detail practically undiscussed, as digging into social theory and the phenomenology […]
  • RSS on Media Queue

  • RSS on Ing Brief

    • Wholism, reductionism (Francois, 2004)
      Proponents of #SystemsThinking often espouse holism to counter over-emphasis on reductionism. Reading some definitions from an encyclopedia positions one in the context of the other (François 2004).
    • It matters (word use)
      Saying “it doesn’t matter” or “it matters” is a common expression in everyday English. For scholarly work, I want to “keep using that word“, while ensuring it means what I want it to mean. The Oxford English Dictionary (third edition, March 2001) has three entries for “matter”. The first two entries for a noun. The […]
    • Systemic Change, Systematic Change, Systems Change (Reynolds, 2011)
      It's been challenging to find sources that specifically define two-word phrases -- i.e. "systemic change", "systematic change", "systems change" -- as opposed to loosely inferring reductively from one-word definitions in recombination. MartinReynolds @OpenUniversity clarifies uses of the phrases, with a critical eye into motives for choosing a specific label, as well as associated risks and […]
    • Environmental c.f. ecological (Francois, 2004; Allen, Giampietro Little 2003)
      The term "environmental" can be mixed up with "ecological", when the meanings are different. We can look at the encyclopedia definitions (François 2004), and then compare the two in terms of applied science (i.e. engineering with (#TimothyFHAllen @MarioGiampietro and #AmandaMLittle, 2003).
    • Christopher Alexander’s A Pattern Language: Analysing, Mapping and Classifying the Critical Response | Dawes and Ostwald | 2017
      While many outside of the field of architecture like the #ChristopherAlexander #PatternLanguage approach, it's not so well accepted by his peers. A summary of criticisms by #MichaelJDawes and #MichaelJOstwald @UNSWBuiltEnv is helpful in appreciating when the use of pattern language might be appropriate or not appropriate.
    • Field (system definitions, 2004, plus social)
      Systems thinking should include not only thinking about the system, but also its environment. Using the term "field" as the system of interest plus its influences leaves a lot of the world uncovered. From the multiple definitions in the International Encyclopedia of Systems and Cybernetics , there is variety of ways of understanding "field".
  • Meta

  • Translate

  • 
  • moments. daviding.com

    Random selections from the past year
  • Creative Commons License
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    Theme modified from DevDmBootstrap4 by Danny Machal