Distractions, reflections

David Ing, at large … Sometimes, my mind wanders

Currently Viewing Posts Tagged queen’s park

2020/07 Moments July 2020

Daytimes full of new work assignment and training, evenings and weekends bicycling around downtown Toronto as it slowly reopens from pandemic.
Toronto, Ontario

Riverside neighbourhood
Riverside neighbourhood: Working from home, new workplace arrangement, as office sent me a 27″ monitor for laptop. I already had a laptop and and monitor, plus computer tower under desk. Setup took 3 hours of company time, a slow day on a holiday weekend. More tweaks are expected, I spend many so many hours at the keyboard. (Riverside neighbourhood, Toronto, Ontario) 20200703
Jack Layton Ferry Terminal
Jack Layton Ferry Terminal: The William Inglis ferry returned to service over the past week, destined for the Ward’s Island dock towards the east. The ship was first put into service in 1935, built by the local company that produced marine engines during World War I. On a late Monday afternoon, saw people lounging on the benches by the boardwalk, consistent with social distancing guidelines. (Jack Layton Ferry Terminal, Queens Quay West, Toronto, Ontario) 20200706
Yonge-Dundas Square
Yonge-Dundas Square: At @YDSquare, waterplay fountains installed by #DanEuser #Waterarchitecture circa 2002 have been turned back on. This signals progress in reopening of the city, after the pandemic shutdown. Filtration system keeps the sprays above pool-level quality. (Yonge-Dundas Square, Toronto, Ontario) 20200714
West End YMCA
West End YMCA: Stone sculpture “Little Champion, Le Petit Champion” installed in 2014, donated and created by Dr. Harry Rosen, a professor of dentistry from McGill University. By the entrance on the west side of the YMCA Building constructed in 1890, with The Great Hall becoming a separate venue in a 2016 restoration. (West End YMCA, College Street at Dovercourt Road, Toronto, Ontario) 20200714
Queen’s Park
Queen’s Park: Privileged to live in a city where children can run free in a public park, and parents are trusting, without regard to their ethnicity or socio-economic status. The King Edward VII Equestrian Statue was installed in 1969 more for the horse, than for the monarch on horseback. Any traces of defacement by protesters are gone, a brief moment in the larger context of time. (Queen’s Park, Toronto, Ontario) 20200721
Chinese Railroad Workers Memorial
Chinese Railroad Workers Memorial: In 1885, the last spike on the railroad joining Canada from east to west was driven in British Columbia, the same year that Canada imposed a head tax on Chinese immigrants. Location of memorial is on the south side of the tracks, facing north towards the most of the city, with Lake Ontario to its back, and the Rogers Centre currently not hosting baseball games. Pedestrians out on the small strip of parkland, enjoying summer weather. (Chinese Railroad Worker Memorial, Blue Jay Way, Toronto, Ontario) 20200727

18 Yonge
18 Yonge: South of overhead rail tracks, @OtternessStudio 2007 “Immigrant Family” bronze in front of #Lanterra building reflects the hope for the future amongst new arrivals to the city. Migrants from Eastern Europe arrived after WWII by ship to Halifax, and by train to Toronto. In the block just north of the elevated Gardiner Expressway, the sculpture is well lit, but the site isn’t on the beaten path for pedestrians. (Immigrant Family sculpture, Yonge Street north of Lake Shore Boulevard, Toronto, Ontario) 20200728
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