Distractions, reflections

David Ing, at large … Sometimes, my mind wanders

RSS seems to be rising in importance

As I’m gradually moving over from push e-mails to RSS on Thunderbird, I’ve started to notice more and more mentions of RSS as being central to future web technologies.

Forbes had pointed out some internal messages from Bill Gates and Ray Ozzie on the “services wave” in software. Ray wrote:

RSS is the internet’s answer to the notification scenarios we’ve discussed and worked on for some time, and is filling a role as ‘the UNIX pipe of the internet’ as people use it to connect data and systems in unanticipated ways.

In the movement away from a small number of news sources to the larger world of self-publishing in blogs, RSS seems to be more reasonable in handling pull technologies.

RSS in Thunderbird, tabbed messages would help

I’ve gradually been adding RSS Feeds to Thunderbird, and removing subscriptions that would be sent to my e-mail. (A lot of Yahoo Groups will support RSS feeds, although some don’t yet).

One annoying feature, so far: an RSS feed (e.g. from Business Week) comes up well in Thunderbird, i.e. it looks like it would in Firefox. However, when I click a link, it brings up a new tab in Firefox — not in Thunderbird. This is actually more-or-less what used to happen when I had the e-mail subscriptions sent to my Lotus Notes e-mail client, and clicking the link there would bring up a page in Firefox. Now that I can use Firefox to view RSS feeds more directly, reading has been a lot smoother. Continue readingRSS in Thunderbird, tabbed messages would help

No nitroglycerin please, I’m an asian non-drinker

The rare people who have ever gone out drinking with me know that I turn red with as little as one ounce of wine. My childhood friend, Paul Boughen (who is now a doctor) said that it was because I was missing the aldehyde hydrogenase enzyme, so that I didn’t digest alcohol. The alcohol would just go directly into my bloodstream. On the other hand, after 3 hours, I would be completely sober, as the alcohol would be flushed from my system.

On the other hand, research published in the Journal of Clinic Investigations suggests that nitroglycerin may do nothing for me if I run into heart issues. Continue readingNo nitroglycerin please, I’m an asian non-drinker

Disruptive innovation, product design vs. business model

I was listening to Clayton Christensen’s talk at the Open Source Business Conference 2004 posted at IT Conversations. I was pretty impressed by the way he spoke. Slowly and clearly, as I could imagine him in a classroom. This talk was given after the release of his second book, The Innovator’s Solution, and referred to his first book, The Innovator’s Dilemma. Continue readingDisruptive innovation, product design vs. business model
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