Distractions, reflections

David Ing, at large … Sometimes, my mind wanders

2008/03/08 Tamachi – Nippori – Keisei Skyliner to Narita

When I left Tokyo in August, I took the bus from Shinagawa to Narita airport. On this trip in, I came from the airport on the Japan Rail Narita Express train. This Saturday afternoon departure had an easy schedule out and I felt adventurous, so I tried the third (slightly cheaper) option: the Keisei Skyliner. My luggage is on wheels. I dragged the bags the few blocks over to Tamachi station.

DI_20080307_Tamachi_station_south_plaza.jpg

I was entertained by the smoking area in the middle of the block, away from anyplace a pedestrian would object.

DI_20080307_Tamachi_smoking_area.jpg

I presume that the translation of the caution is literal.

DI_20080307_Tamachi_smoking_area_sign.jpg

I rode up the escalator into Tamachi station, bought a Japan Rail ticket, and went down to the train platform.

DI_20080307_Tamachi_platform_trains.jpg

The Skyliner starts at Ueno station, where I think that transferring from Japan Rail to Keisei requires crossing the street. An easier alternative may be to transfer at Nippori, which is a smaller and less popular station.

DI_20080307_Nippori_station_platform.jpg

At Nippori, the directions to the Narita train are well marked …

DI_20080307_Nippori_stairs_sign.jpg

… and farther down the platform is an escalator to handle the trolley cases.

DI_20080307_Nippori_escalators.jpg

Coming up into the station, I was a bit confused about where to go.

DI_20080307_Nippori_station_map.jpg

I had ridden Japan Rail to Nippori, but now needed to buy a Keisei ticket. The dispenser is automated with timing for the next train, or reservations for later in the day.

DI_20080307_Nippori_Skyliner_ticket_dispenser.jpg

Construction in the station meant navigating a bit of a maze. The waiting room didn’t look exciting, so I continued down to the platform.

DI_20080307_Nippori_waiting_room.jpg

Directions on the floor direct passengers to their seats where the doors will open. I had to wait a few minutes for the Skyliner to arrive.

DI_20080307_Nippori_train_doors.jpg

Instead of railway ties between the rails, there were full floors under the trains.

DI_20080307_Nippori_platform_train.jpg

Seats in the train are reserved.

DI_20080307_Keisei_Skyliner_car.jpg

Since my prior ride on the Narita Express was at night, I hadn’t seen any sights. My impression is that the Keisei Skyliner runs less out of the way.

DI_20080307_Keisei_Skyliner_crossing_river.jpg

Going through small towns, barricades would come down to stop traffic.

DI_20080307_Keisei_Skyliner_road_intersection.jpg

Even little streets have rail crossings.

DI_20080307_Keisei_Skyliner_road_intersection_pedestrian.jpg

The Skyliner makes just a few station stops.

DI_20080307_Keisei_Skyliner_station_stop.jpg

After a while, the towns gave way to fields, presumably farms.

DI_20080307_Keisei_Skyliner_fields_road.jpg

In the spring, maybe planting had started … or maybe not.

DI_20080307_Keisei_Skyliner_fields.jpg

A windmill was a bit a strange sight. Maybe it was a resort.

DI_20080307_Keisei_Skyliner_windmill.jpg

Farther out from Tokyo, the towns didn’t look as tight or orderly.

DI_20080307_Keisei_Skyliner_town.jpg

Approaching the airport, there’s a lot of large construction.

DI_20080307_Keisei_Skyliner_airport_approach.jpg

At the station, exiting the train and riding the escalator up brings the trip to the end at the turnstiles.

DI_20080307_Narita_airport_turnstiles.jpg

Entering the station, there are inspection stations. The inspectors that day didn’t seem very interested.

DI_20080307_Narita_airport_hallway.jpg

On the way to checkin, I noticed the ticket counter for the train, had I chosen the Keisei Skyliner on the way into the city.

DI_20080307_Narita_Airport_Skyliner_ticket_booth.jpg

It’s right across the aisle from the Japan Rail ticket counter.

DI_20080307_Narita_airport_JR_ticket_booth.jpg

I was boarding an Air China flight for Beijing, which had an extremely long queue. Fortunately, the line moved quite rapidly.

DI_20080307_Narita_airport_Air_China_queue.jpg

On future trips to Tokyo, I think that I’ll plan to take the Keisei Skyliner again. While taking the Narita Express is slightly faster, and would seem to be the more popular way for tourists, transferring from one line to another is required in either case.

  • Recent Posts

  • Archives

  • RSS on Coevolving

  • RSS on Media Queue

  • RSS on Ing Brief

    • Plans as resources for action (Suchman, 1988)
      Two ways of thinking about practice put (i) “plans as determinants of action”, and (ii) “plans as resources for action”. The latter has become a convention, particularly through research into Human Computer Interaction (HCI) and Computer Supported Collaborative Work (CSCW). While the more durable explanation appears the Suchman (1987) book (specifically section “8.2 Plans as […]
    • The best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago
      Does “the best time to plant a tree was twenty years ago and the second best time is now” date back further than 1988? It is time to look long and hard at the value of the urban forest and create the broad-based efforts — in research, funding and citizen participation — needed to improve […]
    • 2019/11/05 13:15 “Barriers to Data Science Adoption: Why Existing Frameworks Aren’t Working”, Workshop at CASCON-Evoke, Markham, Ontario
      Workshop led by @RohanAlexander and @prof_lyons at #CASCONxEvoke on "Barriers to Data Science Adoption: Why Existing Frameworks Aren't Working". For discussion purposes the challenges are grouped within three themes: regulatory; investment; and workforce.
    • Own opinion, but not facts
      “You are entitled to your own opinions, but not to your own facts” by #DanielPatrickMoynihan is predated on @Freakonomics by #BernardMBaruch 1950 “Every man has a right to his own opinion, but no man has a right to be wrong in his facts”. Source: “There Are Opinions, And Then There Are Facts” | Fred Shapiro […]
    • R programming is from S, influenced by APL
      History of data science tools has evolved to #rstats of the 1990s, from the S-Language at Bell Labs in the 1970s, and the
    • Bullshit, Politics, and the Democratic Power of Satire | Paul Babbitt | 2013
      Satire can be an antidote, says Prof. #PaulBabbitt @muleriders , to #bullshit (c.f. rhetoric; hypocrisy; crocodile tears; propaganda; intellectual dishonesty; politeness, etiquette and civility; commonsense and conventional wisdom; symbolic votes; platitudes and valence issues).
  • Meta

  • Translate

  • 
  • moments. daviding.com

    Random selections from the past year
  • Creative Commons License
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    Theme modified from DevDmBootstrap4 by Danny Machal