Distractions, reflections

David Ing, at large … Sometimes, my mind wanders

2008/12/10 Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk, Skyline Drive, Thomas Fogarty Winery

The first day of the conference we were attending in Santa Clara was a tutorial, and very educational.  The second day bridged today’s technology with advances.  The third morning was about industries in which we didn’t have an interest, so we opted to take advantage of our location to visit the Pacific Ocean at Santa Cruz, and tour the Santa Cruz mountains with the possibility to visit some wineries.  It was a little over an hour on a scenic drive to arrive at the Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk.

di_20081210-125502-santacruzboardwalk-entry-group.JPG

On a weekday in December, the rides were silent, and we were practically the ones ones in the park.

di_20081210-125554-santacruzboardwalk-ride.JPG

The Giant Dipper is one of the oldest wooden roller coasters in the United States.

di_20081210-125604-santacruzboardwalk-coaster.JPG

There’s irony that the famous boardwalk is now concrete rather wooden boards.

di_20081210-125640-santacruzboardwalk.JPG

Despite the fact that we hadn’t yet walked on the sand, and the park was empty, Stephen wanted to be first in line for the foot wash station.

di_20081210-125734-santacruzboardwalk-footwash.JPG

The Sky Ride runs along the beach side of the walk.

di_20081210-125834-santacruzboardwalk-beach-skyride.JPG

We wandered south on the beach, to the sound of the ocean washing up against the shore.

di_20081210-130038-santacruzboardwalk-beach-south.JPG

We decided to stroll to the north end of the beach and circle around through the park.

di_20081210-131828-santacruzboardwalk-beach-north.JPG

The Santa Cruz Casino in the early 20th century had a history of burning down, and now operates as the Casino Arcade.

di_20081210-130018-santacruzboardwalk-casino.JPG

At the north end of the boardwalk are real wooden boards by a cafe.  Away from the theme park, the city streets are much closer to the beach.  We started the return walk south.

di_20081210-131926-santacruzboardwalk-view-south.JPG

In the distance, we could see the beach volleyball courts.

di_20081210-131954-santacruzboardwalk-beach-courts.JPG

On a weekday morning, these volleyball players must either have been professionals, or serious athletes.

di_20081210-132150-santacruzboardwalk-beach-volleyball.JPG

Beach Street was quiet.  I could imagine the traffic jams on a summer weekend.

di_20081210-132216-santacruz-beachst.JPG

To rejoin the conference for the afternoon, we had to watch the clock.  The direct route through the Santa Clara Mountains is CA 35 — Skyline Boulevard.  This route doesn’t follow the usual definition of a boulevard, which has a centre median.

di_20081210-141004-skylineblvd.JPG

CA 35 has the feel of a mountain road for the use of local residents.  The main route is relatively clear, with a few smaller roads merging and intersecting.  Actual road signs are few and far between.

di_20081210-141048-skylineblvd-merge.JPG

The road narrowed and widened at various points.  Stephen played his usual role as chauffeur, while I puzzled as navigator.

di_20081210-141558-skylineblvd-ascent.JPG

Coming around a curve, we paused to wait for a truck turning around.  We rolled the window down as he passed by, asking about the address numbering.  The driver gave us some advice — which we later discovered would have misguided us.  The numbering must be associated with various hamlets, so the sequences on Skyline Boulevard don’t run consecutively in one direction.

di_20081210-140834-skylineblvd-turnaround.JPG

Why would anyone put farms up near the ridge of a mountain?

di_20081210-141840-skylineblvd-tree-farm.JPG

It seems that, in addition to the Santa Cruz mountains being known for wineries, it’s a Christmas tree trail.

di_20081210-141906-skylineblvd-tree-farm-sign.JPG

Continuing north on CA 35, the view opened up.  I’m not sure exactly where we were, but it’s probable that we had reached the Open Space Preserves, looking west.

di_20081210-142620-skylineblvd-view-w.JPG

We paused to take photos.  Since I’m not a camper, I can’t imagine hiking through this region.

di_20081210-142616-skylineblvd-view-nw.JPG

Seeing cyclists on this road was unexpected.  With relatively low traffic, I would guess that these are riders who are used to being on their saddles for hours, and climbing steep inclines.

di_20081210-144652-skylineblvd-cyclists.JPG

After wondering if we had gotten completely lost, we found the gates to the Thomas Fogarty Winery.

di_20081210-150032-thomasfogarty-entry.JPG

The pond and the well-kept grounds suggest that the site might be desirable for private events.

di_20081210-150216-thomasfogarty-pond.JPG

This property is but just one of the many vineyards for the winery.  The Portal Springs Estate vineyard grows chardonnay on a steep incline, much like it might have on the original terroir in Burgundy.

di_20081210-150238-thomasfogarty-portolaspringsvineyard.JPG

The tasting room is part of an impressive pavilion complex.  Inside, we were surprised to see some displays of medical instruments from Dr. Fogarty in his previous career.

di_20081210-150354-thomasfogarty-tastingroom.JPG

Through an open door, we saw some sample fermentation tanks that must serve as significant visual aids in a tour.

di_20081210-150404-thomasfogarty-tanks.JPG

The range of wines at this winery is broad:  Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, and the infamous Pinot Noir.

di_20081210-150538-thomasfogarty-wine-display.JPG

We sampled a few wines.  None of chose to spit.  I held my consumption down to just a few mouthsful, and still got the Asian blush.

di_20081210-150702-thomasfogarty-tasting-bar.JPG

As we left the winery, the haze to the southeast seems heavier than we had seen looking west.

di_20081210-145532-skylineblvd-view-se.JPG

Looking to the northeast, the proximity to Silicon Valley was striking.

di_20081210-145542-skylineblvd-view-ne.JPG

From the winery, there wasn’t a route directly east back to our conference.  We continued north on Skyline Boulevard to Woodside, which took us much farther north in Silicon Valley than I would have expected.  We drove through our hunger to make it back to our afternoon meetings, ordering lunch during the afternoon coffee break.

[Start a large-image lightbox screen show over this blog post (in a supported browser)]

[See the webphotos album (with a slideshow option)]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Cruz,_California
  • Recent Posts

  • Archives

  • RSS on Coevolving

    • Entropy: The Second Law of Thermodynamics | David L. Hawk | ST-ON 2021-03-14
      For espoused systems thinkers who are predisposed towards towards finding an equilibrium (or maybe one amongst multiple equilibria), a discussion about entropy can raise discomfort.  In the systems sciences, the second law of thermodynamics — as an entropic process — is often cited by the learned as a universal law applicable across physics, chemistry, biology […]
    • Systems Thinking through Changes: An action learning guide | Canadian Digital Service | 2022-03-04
      In the 4th year of an espoused 10-year journey, the Systems Changes Learning Circle reached a major milestone.  With Code for Canada, the team conducted its first educational workshop based on the contextural action learning approach currently under review for publication.  The client was the Canadian Digital Service . The presentation outlining the basic ideas and […]
    • Schizophrenia, Alcoholism, Double Binds: From Practice to System Theory | Gary S. Metcalf | ST-ON 2021-02-21
      Many might sequence systems thinking as (i) systems theory preceding (ii) systems practice.  This is not always the case.  There are situations where (i) systems practice has preceded (ii) systems theory, or the two advance in a tight learning loop.  Jack Ring once pointed out that applied science (engineering) precedes science, because human beings often […]
    • Living, Becoming, Process Philosophy: Systems Thinking in Time (ST-ON 2022-01-10)
      System thinking, coming from roots in mainstream Western philosophy, tends to orient towards (i) thinking in space,  before (ii) thinking in time.  Structure is an arrangement in space.  Process is an arrangement in time.  A critical systems perspective leads us to think about inclusion within boundaries.  Does this lead us to overlook boundaries in time? […]
    • Progress on Systems Changes Learning | CSRP Institute | 2022-11-07
      The Systems Changes Learning Circle, formed in January 1999, has since been meeting at least once every 3 weeks.  In many respects, the core group has exhibited great patience in our mutual learning towards an agenda of Rethinking Systems Thinking, from talks given in 2012, and published in 2013. In anticipation of a journal article […]
    • Ecological Economics and Systems Thinking | Katie Kish + David Mallery | (ST-ON 2021-10-18)
      In the 1980s, ecological economics seemed to be mostly economists extending their work towards environmental and resource concerns.  In the 2020s, ecological economics is seeing a new generation first schooled in other disciplines such as environmental studies or one of the social sciences, then coming into economics.  Programs that encourage the new perspective include the  […]
  • RSS on Media Queue

  • RSS on Ing Brief

    • Book review of ZHANG, Zailin (2008) “Traditional Chinese Philosophy as the Philosophy of the Body” | Robin R. Wang | 2009
      In this review of a philosophical work written in Chinese, a comparison is made between Chinese philosophy centering on the body, in comparison to Western philosopy centered on the mind. (I found a reference to this book, tracing back from Keekok Lee (2017) Chapter 9, footnote 8.
    • Approche systémique
      The translation from English "systems thinking" to French "la pensée systémique" misses meaning. "Approche systémique" has lineage to "Conférences Macy", "General System Theory (Bertalanffy)" and "Gregory Bateson"
    • The Arrogance of Humanism (1978/1981) David W. Ehrenfeld
      When one chooses a guiding philosophy of life  -- and the modern world has chosen humanism -- one becomes responsible for all the consequences that flow from that choice. (David W. Ehrenfeld, 1981)
    • The evolution of service systems to service ecosystems | Brozović and Tregua 2022
      “Rethinking Systems Thinking” (2013) is cited by #DaniloBrozović (U. Skövde), #MarcoTregua (U. Napoli Federico II): The level of complexity in current service ecosystems is rising, not least due to technology (Barile et al., 2020), with the effect of such increased complexity of service ecosystems being perceived as ‘simple’. On the other hand, some systems researchers […]
    • 1995 Francois Jullien, The Propensity of Things
      Jullien views propensity in Chinese philosophy, as a counterpart to causality in Western philosophy.  Some unpacking of his writing in digests may be helpful. Jullien, François. 1995. The Propensity of Things: Toward a History of Efficacy in China. Translated by Janet Lloyd. Zone Books. Introduction How can we conceive of the dynamic in terms of the static, in […]
    • Reformation and transformation (Ackoff 2003, 2010)
      In his system of system concepts, Russell Ackoff made the distinction between reformation and transformation in many of his lectures. Here are two written sources. From Redesigining Society (2003) … Systemic Transformation A system is transformed, as contrasted with reformed, when its structure or functions are changed fundamentally. Such changes are discontinuous and qualitative, quantum […]
  • Meta

  • Translate

  • Creative Commons License
    This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License
    Theme modified from DevDmBootstrap4 by Danny Machal