Distractions, reflections

David Ing, at large … Sometimes, my mind wanders

2008/10/03 Fredericton, New Brunswick

It’s less than a 90-minute drive from Saint John to Fredericton, so we had a mid-morning run on Highway 7 through scenic New Brunswick.  Fredericton is much smaller than Saint John, but has the feature that it’s the capital of New Brunswick.

DI_20081003 105608 NB Highway7 n

We again arrived with enough time for lunch and some sightseeing.  By the Saint John River, there’s a park with the Lighthouse Adventure Centre.

DI_20081003 131104 Fredericton LighthouseAdventureCentre

We walked around the front side, to see that the lighthouse was completely closed.  On a cool fall weekday, there wouldn’t be too much demand for ice cream on the ground floor.

DI_20081003 131212 Fredericton LighthouseAdventureCentre

Looking down, we saw the south section of the Riverfront Trail beside the shore.  The Saint John River curves, with a flow to southeast at this point.

DI_20081003 131228 Fredericton RiverfrontTrail e

The Riverfront Trail continues to the north, where we could see the Westmorland Street Bridge leading to Nashwaaksis, a neighbourhood now amalgamated with Fredericton.

DI_20081003 131234 Fredericton RiverfrontTrail w

As we walked back from the shore on Regent Street, the York-Sunbury Museum was right across the street, at the southeast end of Officer’s Square.

DI_20081003 131034 Fredericton York-SunburyMuseum

We turned onto Queen Street.  Checking our watches, we still had time before our meeting, so we decided to find out what the museum is about.  It’s run by the York-Sunbury Historical Society, reflecting not only those two counties, but also the general history of New Brunswick.

DI_20081003 131902 Fredericton York-SunburyMuseum

The museum houses the controversial Coleman Frog.  It was either overfed and preserved after death, or a hoax perpetrated on the community.

DI_20081003 134214 Fredericton York-SunburyMuseum FredsFamousFrogs

One room of the museum featured typical farm tools from bygone days.

DI_20081003 134252 Fredericton York-SunburyMuseum farm tools

Other displays that I found interesting included the 1940s war brides from Europe (e.g. bringing Italians into Canada), and the Acadians, with French settlements in the area before 1700.

After the short visit to the museum, we walked westward on Queen Street.  Across the street, the buildings are more modern.

DI_20081003 131708 Fredericton QueenStreet view w

Further along, the historic Garrison district has been converted into craft shops and restaurants.

DI_20081003 141342 Fredericton Garrison district

There’s a Visitor Information Centre in City Hall, where we found some local maps.

DI_20081003 141904 Fredericton City Hall

The fountain in front of City Hall has traditional touches.

DI_20081003 142028 Fredericton CityHall fountain

For lunch, we looked over on Regent Street, up from the lighthouse.

DI_20081003 130830 Fredericton RegentStreet view s

The reviews on The Blue Door Restaurant suggested a good option for lunch.

DI_20081003 130810 Fredericton TheBlueDoor

The menu had an interesting choice of fusion cuisine.  The most remarked item was Yesterday’s Soup; because soup always tastes better on the next day.  Stephen asked if he could have today”s soup, but was told to “come back tomorrow”

DI_20081003 120418 Fredericton TheBlueDoor lunch

After our meeting in Fredericton, we made a direct drive to the Saint John airport, which isn’t near the city centre, but beyond it on the east side.  It’s the most modest airport that I’ve been to, in some time.

DI_20081003 184026 SaintJohn airport

We had expected a full-service restaurant at the airport, and were surprised to find only a small snack bar.  To their credit, when you request a chicken sandwich, it’s made to order … from whole pieces of chicken.  Stephen somehow lost his boarding pass, and when he went to the check-in counter to ask for another, the clerk didn’t even ask for his name.

On the flight, we were all tired after visiting three cities in two provinces in three days.  I’ve now had a taste of the Atlantic provinces of Canada, and appreciate the slower pace and sense of tradition in these original pre-Confederation settlements.

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